ipad presets

Mar 21, 2012 at 10:06 AM

Hello and thank you for the work you put into making VidCoder.

I came across VC from a post on the Handbrake forum while looking  through posts concerning the removal of target size in version 0.96. I used Handbrake to convert DVD's to 700mb m4v's.

Since VC was based on latest Handbrake and still has target size included, I decided to give it a shot. My impression are very good, I like your interface but I have 1 question and 1 bug? to report.

Starting with the bug (not so sure). In a lot of encodes I see that the encoding time fluctuates a lot and is misreported. I am not constantly infront of the encoding pc but it has happened to me in a lot of encodes.

My question is, is there a preset for encoding for the ipad dimensions. I have a lot of childrens DVD's which I want to encode into good quality files for the iPad of approx 500mb each max. I found presets for Handbrake but I dont want to go back to that.

 

Any help is appreciated

 

Coordinator
Mar 21, 2012 at 2:36 PM

When you say "The encoding time fluctuates a lot" do you mean the estimated time? I assume you're doing 2-pass?

Is there something wrong with the "Apple iPad" built-in preset?

Mar 22, 2012 at 9:42 AM

 

When you say "The encoding time fluctuates a lot" do you mean the estimated time? I assume you're doing 2-pass?

I apologize, I totally forgot the in built preset. In Handbrake I had inserted another preset I found online so I was operating under the same logic with VC too. I will give the built-in preset a go today to see the results. Is it ok as is or do you have any suggestions/tweaks, etc?

Also can someone please suggest a good preset, or set of manual options to use for converting my dvd's to 700mb avi's in order to be viewed on a popcorn A-210 media player? 

 

As for your question, yes I meant the estimated time, and yes I am doing a 2-pass, the first one turbo. I know approx from Handbrake how long each pass takes cause I use to look at the estimated time. In VC when it gets to the second pass, it often fluctuates its estimated time. Not a biggie, just asking if anyone else has noticed.

 

Thank you for your answer, much appreciated.

Coordinator
Mar 22, 2012 at 2:37 PM

Yeah it's not always super accurate on the 2-pass encoding. It's impossible to know ahead of time how much time each pass is going to take so it makes a guess.

Mar 23, 2012 at 11:06 AM
RandomEngy wrote:

Yeah it's not always super accurate on the 2-pass encoding. It's impossible to know ahead of time how much time each pass is going to take so it makes a guess.

I can live with that, no problem there, thanx for the reply.

 

Concerning my other question, could you please advise me as to which would be the best preset/set of options to use to convert my DVD's for future viewing on a popcorn hour A-210 media player? 

I tried 1 or 2 suggestion I found on other forums concerning handbrake options but the result wasn't what I expected. I am looking to get a fixed size of 700mb but I am open to suggestion if the end result is close to that. I am saying that because I found another post of yours suggesting we use constant quality for better results. Saying I pick CQ how can I calculate the size of the end file? 

Coordinator
Mar 23, 2012 at 2:35 PM

I don't have any experience with that device. Is there any particular reason you want a size of 700 MB? Do you have to burn it to a CD and play it off of that?

Mar 23, 2012 at 4:16 PM

As I said, it can be under 1GB so I can save some space. It doesn't have to be 700mb exactly, I just though it would practical as a size. How can I calculate approx how large the end file will be when using constant quality? Is it a trial and error thing?

Coordinator
Mar 23, 2012 at 4:37 PM

You can't calculate ahead of time how big a file will be when you use Constant Quality. But this is a good thing! Some videos are simply more difficult to compress than others. Videos with not much detail and not much movement you can compress much more without making the picture quality bad (animation, for instance). Videos with lots of detail and fast movement are more difficult. They simply require more data to look good.

When you have a fixed output size for a video, it's not a great state of affairs. You'll be throwing extra data at simple videos that don't need it. And when that really complex video comes along you won't have the data required to make it look good and end up with a crummy artifact-laden mess.

Constant Quality is great because it's saying "make the file as small as possible, while making sure the picture looks at least this good." It's using the exact amount of data you need: no more and no less. It gives you the confidence that your videos will look good no matter how busy the picture is and that they won't be wasting data no matter how simple or calm the picture is.

Sensible values are usually from 18-25. Start with Quality 20 for DVD material or 22 for HD material. Higher values mean lower quality and lower bitrate. Tweak the value a bit and see what you like.

Mar 23, 2012 at 7:04 PM

Thank you for the detailed response buddy, will play around with the settings this weekend and see what the result is.