Copying TV program from DVD for youtube

Aug 24, 2014 at 9:45 PM
Edited Aug 24, 2014 at 9:45 PM
I have recorded some PAL tv shows on a standalone dvd recorder. I would like to ripp them to h264 mp4 files, so I can upload them on youtube.

I played a little bit with the settings and while the results look decent, I'm not sure if I'm doing everything right.

For example, do I really need to enable the anamorphic option? I just turned it off, because I dont really understand why would I need it. Did I do wrong?

The dvd's are in PAL 720:576. There are black bars on the side, which Vidcoder can automatically crop quite well. But this is confusing to me, because after the cropping the picture is not 720:576 anymore.

Since the material is not HD, 640x480 on youtube would be OK for me, but how to do it properly? With automatic cropping turned on and keep aspect turned on, it gives me 640:490.

I forced 640x480 with "keep aspect ratio" OFF and auto cropping ON and the result looks fine, but does that mean that I shrunk the picture? It does not look distorted, but still, I'd like to do everything properly.

The original frame rate is 25 fps, but for some reason I got better results with 29,97. Otherwise the video looks a little bit "slower".

Note also that the video is interlaced, so I used the decomb filter (fast preset) to get rid of those artifacts. It works well, at least it looks to me so.

Please tell me how to do everything properly. Thank you.
Coordinator
Aug 25, 2014 at 7:35 AM
Have you read the HandBrake Anamorphic Guide?
Aug 25, 2014 at 7:25 PM
Yes, I did, but I dont really understand it. Do I really need to turn on the anamorphic option? I have a dvd recorded from pal tv 720x576, not a widescreen movie.
Coordinator
Aug 25, 2014 at 7:58 PM
Well whether or not to turn on anamorphic depends on understanding pixel aspect ratios. Anamorphic can preserve the pixel aspect ratio of a source video and give you better quality. But some players don't support those non-standard pixel aspect ratios, so you shouldn't use it then.